Campfires in BTV not ok

Home Forums BigTrees Talk Campfires in BTV not ok

This topic contains 19 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  Sierrashoo 2 months, 2 weeks ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5568

    Sierrashoo
    Participant

    As I post another wildfire warning coming from CalFire. Please make responsible choices.

    #5567

    Sierrashoo
    Participant

    Please, please. No more personal fires of any kind this summer. BLM has banned any fire – campfire permit notwithstanding. There’s even a ban on smoking outdoors. It’s 90 degrees outside right now according to my thermometer. One good poppy log could be disastrous no matter how well you’ve constructed your fire pit. If you need to entertain kids, consider setting up an outdoor sheet/projection area. Microwave some smores or do old fashioned popcorn on your stove top. PLEASE. When I smell your fire it’s not in any way shape or form comforting. Autumn will be here soon enough, and will the rain. We can do this all again then.

    #5555

    Ptown Matt
    Participant

    We all want to be responsible and follow the law….things can happen that we don’t anticipate. I am putting on a warm coat if I get cold this summer.

    #5553

    uttb
    Participant

    Wasn’t started by a warming fire and this isn’t about the fire, it’s about legal and responsible. Try to tell campers in the park they shouldn’t have fires

    #5549

    Ptown Matt
    Participant

    Drive by the home that burned on Iroquois Dr and decide how important that campfire really is this summer.

    #5546

    uttb
    Participant

    OK. Here’s the deal. I checked with cal fire and my fire pit meets all the requirements for a warming fire even during the currently enacted restrictions. If they go beyond warming to partying, by all means, call cal fire

    #5545

    Sierrashoo
    Participant

    Unfortunately, it’s because of the folks, like my new neighbors who like the spark of a bonfire that I can see from my living room (and I will call next time they come up to party), the Forest Service is stepping in and starting to regulate all fires – including my beloved charcoal grill. It’s unclear to me, however, if a “campfire permit” is the same as the Special Use permit referenced in the notice from the Stanislaus Nat’l Forest or not. Points 2&4 especially confusing.

    Pursuant to 36 CFR 261.50(e), the following persons are exempt from this Order :

    1. Persons with a permit from the Forest Service specifically authorizing the otherwise prohibited act or omission.

    2. Persons with a valid California Campfire Permit are not exempt from the prohibitions listed above. However, persons with a valid California Campfire Permit may use a portable stove or lantern using gas, jellied petroleum, or pressurized liquid fuel on National Forest System lands within the High Hazard Area .

    3. Any Federal,State, or local officer, or member of an organized rescue or fire fighting force in the performance of an official duty.

    4. Persons with a Special Use Permit from the Forest Service for a recreation residence on National Forest System lands within the High Hazard Area are not exempt from the prohibitions listed above. However, persons with a Special Use Permit from the Forest Service for a recreation residence on National Forest System lands within the High Hazard Area may use a campfire or stove fire at their recreation residence.

    Thoughts?

    #5544

    Dogwood
    Participant

    I have a warming fire in a cast iron Chimea type pit on occasion. I think as long as you are responsible for making sure your warming fire is out before bed time and keeping the hose handy it’s fine. The best solution are those heavy steel rings that you can bury like the ones at state parks surrounded by gravel. That’s a future project for me.

    #5541

    Sierrashoo,
    I totally get your fear. I still have my pictures packed up and ready to grab should there be another fire here or nearby. I am also afraid of bears. I do not shoot them. Instead, I think I am so lucky to live in an area where I have bears roam into my yard. If the neighbors are new just tell them to keep a hose nearby and put it out when they go to sleep. Go meet your neighbors. Sounds like they are happy and enjoying their new cabin.

    #5540

    uttb
    Participant

    . Those holding special use permits for a recreation residence may use a campfire or stove at that residence

    #5539

    Sierrashoo
    Participant

    More “warming fires” here in the hood tonight. But as of today? NOT OK!!! I’m going to even have to put the charcoal grill away. Small price to ensure we don’t end up like the folks down south.

    Stanislaus National Forest enacts temporary fire restrictions in High Hazard Areas
    Release Date: Jul 20, 2017
    Contact(s): Dianba Fredlund (209) 288-6261
    Sonora, Calif.– Due to high fire danger, the Stanislaus National Forest enacted temporary fire restrictions in High Hazard Areas on July 20, effective through the end of the official 2017 fire season. Included are the High Hazard Area map (Exhibit A), the Forest Order (Exhibit B) and the exemptions list (Exhibit C). Information on fire restrictions and the Forest Order are available at https://go.usa.gov/xRjQ5.
    Forest Order STF-16-2017-05 prohibits campfires, briquette barbecues and smoking outside developed campgrounds. Welding and blasting activities in are also restricted in designated High Hazard Areas of the Forest.
    In specific cases, individuals may be exempt from these fire restrictions. For further information, please review the Forest Order and High Hazard Area map on the Forest web site. This Forest Order serves as an extra measure to help reduce the potential for large and damaging wildfires.
    Stanislaus National Forest leadership and fire personnel thank the public for doing their part to help prevent destructive wildfires. Please know the restrictions in High Hazard Areas will be actively patrolled by Forest law enforcement officers and fire prevention specialists. Persons found in violation of these fire restrictions may be cited and fined.
    Criteria for activating prohibitions in the High Fire Hazard Area through a forest order is based on National Fire Danger Rating System indices and fuel moisture conditions. The Forest currently meets the criteria for activating the High Fire Hazard fire restrictions using the Mt. Elizabeth weather station as a representative site. These restrictions are believed to be the most immediate and effective method to reduce the potential for loss of life and property, and to protect the physical, biological, and cultural resources of the forest from fire.
    The mission of the U.S. Forest Service, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Public lands the Forest Service manages contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live.
    For information on fire restrictions or other Forest information, please call:
    Stanislaus NF Supervisor’s Office: 209-532-3671
    Calaveras Ranger District: 209-795-1381
    Helpful links:
    https://www.fs.usda.gov/Inte…/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd551073.pdf
    https://www.fs.usda.gov/detailf…/stanislaus/alerts-notices/…
    https://www.fs.usda.gov/Inte…/FSE_DOCUMENTS/fseprd551044.pdf (MAP OF HIGH HAZARD AREA INCLUDES ALL OF ARNOLD AND UP HWY 4 PAST BIG TREES VILLAGE.)

    #5537

    My entire neighborhood has camp fires in the summer. We all have hoses close by and ours are never very big. It’s a social thing..smores, kids, neighbors. We always put them out with a hose before we go to bed. That’s the magic of living up here. We leave our driveway on a quad and can ride for miles too. This is why people buy 2nd homes to enjoy these things..that we all get to enjoy everyday. I would suggest going to the “new ” neighbor and just remind them that it is a good idea to have a hose near by and put it out when they go to bed. There is nothing better than neighbors, family and kids enjoying smores by a campfire.

    #5536

    Sierrashoo
    Participant

    And tonight, with ash falling all around; there’s a new “warming fire” I’m smelling. Again; campfires in BTV just not ok.

    #5535

    mr ellis
    Participant

    Precisely my point, and after 28 years coming to the area I find that “responsibility” is sorely lacking amongst the new comers.

    BTW, who the heck needs a “campfire” by their home in the dead of summer??????

    #5532

    uttb
    Participant

    Campfires are never going away. Be responsible. That’s all. The current fires are the result of other sources

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  uttb.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 20 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.